Saturday, December 5, 2020

ICC Postpones 2022 Women’s T20 World Cup to Feb 2023 Keeping in Mind Players’ Intense Workload

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The International Cricket Council (ICC) has postponed the 2022 edition of the Women’s T20 World Cup to 2023 with an underlying purpose to avoid a cluttering of marquee events in the 2022 season and manage the heavy workload of women cricketers across the national teams.

The 2022 ICC Women’s T20 World Cup was slated to be held in November 2022 but will now be held in February 2023. 2022 would be a jam packed season in women’s international cricket with the 2022 Commonwealth Games scheduled to be held in July 2022 and the ICC Women’s World Cup (50-over) slated to be played in Nov next year.

2022 ICC Women’s T20 World Cup Becomes The Second Event After The Women’s World Cup (50 Overs) To Be Postponed Keeping In Mind Hectic International Calendar

The postponement of the 2020 ICC Women’s World Cup is the second major marquee event being deferred by the apex cricket body post the 50 over Women’s World Cup scheduled to be played in New Zealand from 2021 to 2022 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The board confirmed that the ICC Women’s T20 World Cup will move from its current slot at the end of 2022 to 9-26 February 2023,” ICC said in a statement. If not postponed, the year would have “three major events in 2022 with the Commonwealth Games in July 2022 and the ICC Women’s T20 World Cup due to be held in November 2022.”

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“As there are currently no major women’s events scheduled to take place in 2023 the board confirmed the switch for the T20 World Cup to better support player preparation and to continue to build the momentum around the women’s game beyond 2022,” the apex body said.

“Moving the ICC Women’s T20 World Cup to 2023 makes perfect sense on a number of levels,” ICC CEO Manu Sawhney said in the statement.

“Firstly, it will provide a better workload balance for players giving them the best possible opportunity to perform to the highest levels on a global stage.” Secondly, we can continue to build the momentum around the women’s game through 2022 and into 2023. We are committed to fueling the growth of the women’s game and todays decision enables us to do that over the longer term. ”

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